Nature & Environment

Bogenfels: the rock arch of the Sperrgebiet

When I was growing up on a farm east of Windhoek in the late 60s, collecting post felt like collecting treasure because of the attractive stamps that were attached to the envelopes.

Padlangs - The baobab toilet of Katima Mulilo

Who cannot be awed by the king of trees, the mighty baobab? The hollow centres of some of these majestic trees have been used for various purposes in the past.

The Zambezi floodplains: A bird’s paradise

In the water and on trees, pink-backed pelicans can be seen in company of egrets and Yellow-billed Storks. In Namibia Pink-backed Pelicans occur in the Zambezi region.

Breeding ‘hotspot’ for seabirds supports guano production

Sunsets along the Namibian coast are quite spectacular, especially on sunny days, and are a lovely way to wrap up a relaxing afternoon at the beach.

An all-round colourful spectacle along the Zambezi

Thousands of colourful Carmine Bee-eaters commenced their annual breeding season between Zambezi Mubala Lodge and the Zambezi Mubala Camp on the bank of the Zambezi

Fish patrols during lockdown

The Zambians were not only charged for illegally entering the country but also for violating the lockdown rules of the country, illegal fishing and illegal fishing with mosquito nets.

Theodor Rehbock, the father of the Neckartal dam

If one were to build a solid concrete wall one meter high and one metre wide from Cape Town past Keetmanshoop in the south of Namibia, one would need the same amount of concrete that was used to build the recently-inaugurated Neckartal dam west of Keetman

Namibia´s Father of Integrated Conservation: Garth Owen-Smith

Garth Owen-Smith passed away this morning, 11th April 2020 at the age of 76. He is seen as the Father of Integrated Conservation in Namibia.

Padlangs – Garub in the spotlight

Four young visitors to the country, now identified as French and Canadian citizens, spray-painted graffiti on the walls of the old Garub railway station, afterwards posting the photographs on their social media site.

European Roller: From Serbia to Namibia

It took Farmer Volker Dickhoff by surprise, when together with one of his employees; he was able to catch a European Roller on his farm near Otjiwarongo on February 28th of this year (2020).

When the lilies appear, so does the red-spotted lily weevil

The black weevil with the 2 mm spots in bright red or orange climbs up the stem of a Sandhof lily (Crinum paludosum) without haste and starts to feed on the pedicel.

Namibia builds resilience to climate change

Climate change adaptation and mitigation is very costly and requires mobilisation of funds and a good oversight during implementation.

The one that digs with its teeth

After rainfall, when the land is wet, they start digging. The soil is loosened with the teeth and pushed backwards with the front legs.

Von Bach Dam sluices opened for the 5th time in 50 years

For only the fifth time ever, the sluices of the Von Bach Dam near Okahandja had been opened at 21.00 hours on Sunday 1st March 2020 to release water after the water level reach the 100 percent full capacity mark.

Not a scorpion and no real spider

At the first glance they look scary. Because they represent two animal species that many people are unnecessarily afraid of and loathe: spiders and scorpions.

Leucistic springbok ewe with normal coloured fawn

It is unusual to see a white springbok in the wild. It is even more unusual to see an adult leucistic animal because they cannot blend into the environment as the normal coloured ones.

Nocturnal boat trip to see Fishing Owl, Night Heron and company

It is an exceptional experience to see Namibia's largest owl – the Fishing Owl, also known as Pel's Fishing Owl.

Marvel at celestial bodies - meteorites in Namibia

The clear night sky over Namibia is always fascinating for tourists and locals. One can also see some shooting stars.

Rain makes Etosha come alive and bloom

Like the rest of Namibia, Etosha National Park starts to blossom again when the long-awaited rains finally arrive after several years of drought.

Crustose, foliose and fruticose lichens of the Namib Desert

A single head-sized rock is like a colourful miniature garden. Measuring just a few millimetres, the fragile orange-red fingers of the Namib Sun (Caloplaca elegantissima) seem to cling to the stone.

The Marbled Emperor

After the first good rains from December to February they suddenly appear – in their hundreds. They are seen especially in places where strong sources of light remain switched on all night.

Lions, leopards & other cats

The preparations for a trip to Africa are in full swing – poring over books and watching videos. Evenings are filled with nature documentaries and friends recount exciting safari experiences they had the previous year.

Jojoba oil: liquid ‘gold’ from the Namib Desert

A new project has recently been launched in the Erongo Region. Valuable organic oil is obtained from the nuts of the evergreen jojoba plant

The Wild Horses of the Namib

‘There’s something about the outside of a horse that is good for the inside of a man.’ (Winston Churchill)

Fluffy little balls hovering above fresh green

Less than a meter from the bottom of dried-up Avis Dam on the outskirts of Windhoek, chirping little red and black balls of fluff seem to hover above the fresh greenery.

Rhino custodians named Conservationists of the Year

25 years ago Namibia’s Black Rhino Custodianship programme was launched with the intention to increase the number of black rhinos by ensuring better protection against diseases, natural disasters and poachers.

Drought affects return of the Blue Cranes

The only green seen in Etosha National Park in northern Namibia is that of the mopane trees at present (end of November 2019). Not a single blade of grass is left, not even a dry one.

Invasive Prosopis trees a threat for nature and agriculture

Prosopis was introduced to Namibia more than a century ago. According to local tree expert Luise Hoffmann Prosopis chilensis was imported to then South West Africa in 1912 by the German botanist Kurt Dinter.

Aerobatics, clownery and an amazing family tree

The Bateleur Eagle is one of the most colourful raptors in Namibia. Unfortunately, its numbers have dropped sharply.

Caution – Animals on the road

Animals are unable to judge the speed of an approaching vehicle and often take flight too late – with fatal consequences. And they do not know traffic rules.

Namibia plans future water supply

Namibia has experienced an increase in natural disasters in recent years with northern areas having to cope with floodwaters in 2008-09; and the drought since 2016 is proof of the opposite extreme.

Khaudum: In the stranglehold of drought

No water for the animals, a lack of fuel for pumps and vehicles, a lack of finances, a lack of staff and difficult terrain – these are the challenges that nature conservation officials have to cope with in Khaudum National Park.

Fish stocks at risk – nets need to be banned

Legal and illegal networks are threatening the fish stocks in Namibia’s rivers and reservoirs. There are regulatory laws, but control is lacking.

Africa’s largest and rarest crane

Wattled Cranes are not often seen and they are not easy to spot. They are found on the vast flood plains of the Okavango and Chobe, on the countless islands in the Kwando River and on the wetlands of the Linyanti.

A FASCINATING INSIGHT INTO THE SOUTHERN KALAHARI AND ITS LEOPARDS

Seeing a leopard in the wilds tops the list of most people heading into the wilderness. It is a secretive, solitary and mainly nocturnal cat – factors which make it extremely difficult to see.

A small bird as a symbol of love and forgiveness

He is nimble, clever, cheeky. A feisty little guy who nevertheless tries to keep safe as far as possible.

Water for hippos, other wild animals and cattle

At the end of August, after returning from the CITES conference in Geneva, Namibia's Minister of the Environment and Tourism, Pohamba Shifeta, visited a waterhole in the dried up Chobe River

Termites – doing earthworm work in arid areas

Worker termites industriously carry dry plant material to a small hole in the ground. Others climb onto the few blades of grass and cut them into pieces of two to three centimetres long, ready to be taken into the subterranean nest of the colony.

On the road again - Into Kaokoland

Travelling via the Skeleton Coast from Swakopmund to Palmwag and Epupa Falls elicits a thrill of excitement. It ticks all the boxes for the adventurous at heart and adds a couple more . . .

A passionate rendezvous in the north – where the Chobe and the Zambezi meet

A passionate rendezvous unfolds in the north of Namibia where the Chobe River and the Zambezi River come face to face.

Cold Benguela Current provides abundant fish resources

The Namibian coast is known for its abundance of fish and this is due to a cold ocean current running from south to north near the mainland.

H.E.S.S. Telescope in Namibia explores universe

Namibia's clear night skies away from the larger cities are internationally known among hobby astronomers and certain guest farms often have a telescope ready for them.

Namibia’s surf fish species from up-close

Surf fish must be handled with the utmost care, Van Niekerk emphasizes, and not only so that they survive in captivity. Sport and recreational anglers also need to treat the fish gently.

Snakes abandoned at the front door – Snake Park has new owner

The Swakopmund snake park currently houses some 60 snakes as well as chameleons, geckos, agamas and scorpions.

New book supports the conservation of Carmine Bee-eaters

The bird lover and hobby photographer Pompie Burger launched his latest book tonight (20 June) in Windhoek.

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